Nova Scotia

Baby not breathing when paramedic arrived, court hears

A paramedic who tried to save the life of Ashiqur Rahman's seven-week-old daughter testified Tuesday in Nova Scotia Supreme Court that the infant was not breathing when she arrived on the scene in July 2009.

A paramedic who tried to save the life of Ashiqur Rahman's seven-week-old daughter testified Tuesday in Nova Scotia Supreme Court that the infant was not breathing when she arrived on the scene in July 2009.

Rahman, 25, is charged with manslaughter and aggravated assault in the death of his baby, Aurora Breakthrough.

Jennifer Tummonds was called to the Gottingen Street rooming house where Rahman lived with the baby's mother, Jane Gomes.

She testified that she found Rahman, a Bangladeshi man on a student visa, holding his daughter.

Tummonds testified that she asked him a few times what happened. She said Rahman told her they had had a hard time feeding the baby, and the next thing they knew the baby wasn't breathing.

Tummonds testified that she knew right away that the baby was a "very sick little one, a really sick kid."  

She started CPR in the ambulance, placing two or three fingers on Aurora's tiny chest while a firefighter squeezed air into a mask covering her mouth.

She told the court that the CPR might have broken the baby's ribs.

At the hospital, Tummonds testified, she noticed Gomes who appeared unconcerned.

"[She] just appeared to be standing there, chatting with hospital staff, outwardly not upset to me," Tummonds said.

She described Rahman as "not outwardly appearing upset, not anxious."

That night, Aurora was declared brain dead and placed on life support.  

Halifax police Const. Alex MacAdam testified that he saw blood in the infant's eyes, and he thought it might be a sign of abuse.

Gomes,  24, was also originally charged with manslaughter. She pleaded guilty in April 2010 to the lesser charge of failing to provide the necessities of life in exchange for testifying against her former partner.

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