Nova Scotia

Unwelcome baby bear walks right into Guysborough County home

A Guysborough County, N.S., resident got more than he bargained for when he left a door open and a baby black bear strolled into the porch of his home on Wednesday morning.

Bear clawed a hole in the wall while it was trapped in a porch for 45 minutes

A N.S. homeowner had to call the Department of Lands and Forestry to help with a young bear that made itself at home. (Video: Barry Lumsden) 0:30

A Guysborough County, N.S., resident got more than he bargained for when he left a door open and a baby black bear strolled into the porch of his home on Wednesday morning.

The Queensport resident noticed the bear in time to prevent it from getting inside in his home, said family friend Robert Lumsden.

"His cat kinda went crazy there and he managed to see the bear and lock the inside porch door and he ran out the basement back door," said Lumsden.

The bear was trapped in the porch for about 45 minutes, while the man waited in the driveway for the Department of Lands and Forestry to arrive.

Keeping his distance, a department official used a snow shovel to wedge open the front door to free the bear.

Lumsden's father, Barry Lumsden, filmed a video of the bear's release, which had been viewed about 90,000 times on Facebook, as of Friday evening.

After the door was wedged open using a snow shovel, the bear darted out of the home. (Submitted by Barry Lumsden)

Robert Lumsden said the porch was a little worse for wear.

"It was clawed up pretty good. He had a hole in the back of the wall, probably baseball, basketball-sized hole trying to get out," he said.

The resident declined to be interviewed by CBC News.

Lumsden said his friend has since reassessed his open-door policy.  

"He's doing fine now without a bear in his porch," said Lumsden. "He was a little startled at first, but he's pretty good now. He's going to keep his porch door closed from here on out."

With files from Tom Murphy

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