Nova Scotia

Nova Centre construction a factor in decision to leave downtown, business says

A fixture of Halifax's downtown is relocating to the city's north end, citing ongoing issues with the construction of the Nova Centre as a factor in the move.

Attica has been located downtown for 20 years

Attica co-owner Suzanne Saul says the decision to leave Barrington Street was "not a decision that we took lightly." (Google Maps)

A fixture of Halifax's downtown is relocating to the city's north end, citing ongoing issues with the construction of the Nova Centre as a factor in the move.

The Furniture store Attica, currently located on Barrington Street, will soon be shifting its operations to a newly constructed building at 3065 Robie Street.

"Operating a furniture store has its challenges downtown anyway," Suzanne Saul, one of the store's co-owners, told CBC's Information Morning. 

"And the past few years have been even more so."

Businesses seeking compensation

Attica is one of eight businesses that are seeking compensation for lost revenues due to construction. Business owners have said they've lost as much as 30 per cent of their revenue from disruptions caused by the project.

Attica says the disruption caused by the construction of the Nova Centre is a factor in their decision to leave the downtown. (CBC)

Saul said, as a furniture store, Attica doesn't depend as much on pedestrian traffic to drum up business and may not be as adversely affected by construction as other shops and restaurants.

But she said the convention centre's effect on foot traffic has still been challenging.

"We definitely can see an impact on our business."

Increased parking, bigger floor space

When the lease on the store's space expired in July, Saul said they weighed the hassle of moving against the benefits of a larger floor space, increased parking and location free from the inconveniences affecting downtown.

"It's a big store to move,"  said Saul.

"So it's not a decision that we took lightly."

'Very challenging'

Saul said she and her partner also considered whether they could hold out for what Barrington Street could become once the construction wraps up, but decided it wasn't feasible. 

"It's partly how long can you afford to wait, and the past three years certainly have been very challenging for us."

"I think it's going to be great, but I just don't know when."

With files from CBC's Information Morning

now