Nova Scotia

Atlantic School of Theology to create peaceful garden

An overgrown stretch of Halifax's Northwest Arm waterfront will be transformed into a garden by the Atlantic School of Theology.

'I made a place that I would like to spend time at,' says landscape technician

Moxsom-Skinner said the first phase of the project this year is estimated to cost about $20,000, but the most elaborate version of the garden could cost as much as $100,000. (CBC News)

A stretch of Halifax's Northwest Arm waterfront has been overgrown for almost a decade, but this summer it will be transformed into a garden by the Atlantic School of Theology.

That will be nice for students, and the school's new long term tenant, Hospice Halifax, said Linda Moxsom-Skinner, advancement director of Atlantic School of Theology.

"I can imagine people coming down here when it's been a very difficult time, and just being able to gather themselves, and to figure out how to go the next step," she said.

It's endless, the joy that we're going to be able to experience.- Linda Moxsom-Skinner

Still a lot of work to do

Moxsom-Skinner is the "brains" behind the project, and Rowan Josh Dansie is the "hands," according to Dansie. Dansie is the landscape technician for the garden, thanks to a six-week government grant provided to the school.

"I made a place that I would like to spend time at," Dansie said during a break from clearing the ground.

So far, he's cleared the trails for the future garden, through what was dense brush.

He's added a network of paths to help visitors imagine what the finished project will look like, he said, but still has a lot of work to do.

'Very rewarding'

Beneath the hot summer sun, Dansie said he is in good spirits.

"It's very rewarding," he said.

"I've done landscaping for some time, but I've never done something to this extent or this scale — and it's nice to see people walking through and enjoying it."

Cost anywhere from $20K to 100K

Moxsom-Skinner said the first phase of the project this year is estimated to cost about $20,000, but the most elaborate version of the garden could cost as much as $100,000.

The school will depend on a combination of support from government and other sponsors, she said.

"I think it's endless, the joy that we're going to be able to experience in this space," Moxsom-Skinner said.

"There's a number of different areas, almost like different rooms that you can go into, and still be at peace with yourself and all that nature has to offer."

About the Author

Jacqueline Hansen

Senior Business Reporter

Jacqueline Hansen is a senior business reporter for CBC News. Based in Toronto, she's been covering business and other news beats since 2010.