Nova Scotia

Atlantic Film Festival 2015 to feature 208 films over 8 days

The Atlantic Film Festival is screening 208 films in eight days in Halifax as part of its 35th anniversary celebrations. Here are five films guaranteed to entertain.

30,000 people are expected to attend this year's screenings at festival

Brooklyn tells the story of a young Irish immigrant who moves to New York City in the 1950s. (Atlantic Film Festival)

The Atlantic Film Festival is screening 208 films in eight days at Park Lane Cinemas in Halifax as part of its 35th anniversary celebrations.

The festival begins showing films Friday evening and it is anticipated 30,000 people will attend the festival's screenings, which showcase everything from local shorts to feature-length Hollywood films.

Here are five must-see films:

Brooklyn

Brooklyn tells the story of a young Irish immigrant who moves to New York City in the 1950s and falls in love, but is torn between her homeland and a new life. This will be shown tonight at 9:30 p.m.

Into the Forest

This feature film stars Ellen Page and Evan Rachel Wood as two sisters living in a forest, learning to survive in the wake of society's sudden collapse. The film is adapted from Jean Hegland's novel of the same name. The film screens on Saturday, Sept. 19 at 7 p.m.

Duty Calls

In this dark comedy drama, a beat cop wrestles with his duty as an officer when faced with arresting an unruly drunk woman. This will be shown on Sunday, Sept. 20 at 1 p.m.

First Weekend

A Nova Scotia-made film that follows the journey of a man and his daughter as they reunite after a family break up. The homegrown films plays on Sunday, Sept. 20 at 7 p.m.

Beeba Boys

This Canadian crime thriller is directed by Oscar-nominated Deepa Mehta. It tells the story of a Indo-Canadian gang involved in the Vancouver drug scene. The film will be shown on Thursday, Sept. 24 at 7 p.m.

Tickets for the festival can be purchased at the Park Lane box office or at the Atlantic Film Festival website.

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