Nova Scotia

As 20 days pass with no new COVID-19 cases in N.S., lifeguards set to hit beaches soon

Nova Scotia has now gone 20 days without a new COVID-19 case and has no known active cases, the province said Monday.

Lifeguards will have extra tools to stay safe during pandemic as they return to 23 beaches Wednesday

Lifeguards in Nova Scotia will watch 23 beaches beginning Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily until Aug. 30. (Molly Segal/CBC)

Nova Scotia has now gone 20 days without a new COVID-19 case and has no known active cases, the province said Monday.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre's microbiology lab completed 255 Nova Scotia tests on Sunday. The last new case was reported June 9.

On Monday, the Nova Scotia Lifeguard Service said 82 lifeguards will begin supervising 23 beaches across the province on Wednesday, which is Canada Day. Lifeguards carried out 110 rescues last year, the service said.

Lifeguards will work from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily until Aug. 30. They'll have extra equipment to stay safe from COVID-19.

"We encourage all Nova Scotians to continue to follow public health measures, like social distancing, while at the beach this summer," said Paul D'Eon, director of the Nova Scotia Lifeguard Service.

On Friday, Nova Scotia will open a travel bubble with New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador, meaning residents can travel among the provinces without self-isolating upon arrival.

Visitors from outside the Atlantic bubble will still have to self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival, but once they do that they can freely travel among the four provinces.

COVID-19 symptoms

People with one or more of the following COVID-19 symptoms are asked to visit 811's website:

  • Fever (chills, sweats).
  • Cough or worsening of a previous cough.
  • Sore throat.
  • Headache.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Muscle aches.
  • Sneezing.
  • Nasal congestion/runny nose.
  • Hoarse voice.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Unusual fatigue.
  • Loss of sense of smell or taste.
  • Red, purple or bluish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers that do not have a clear cause.

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