Nova Scotia

Sea snails project 1 of 11 fisheries projects to get government cash

A shrimp processing plant in Arichat, N.S., is going to use some new federal and provincial funding to start processing sea snails.

Ottawa and the Nova Scotia government are spending $1.2 million on the projects

Wayne Fowlie, plant manager at Premium Seafoods in Arichat, N.S., describes sea snails as an 'underutilized species.' (Shutterstock)

A shrimp processing plant in Arichat, N.S., is going to use some new federal and provincial funding to start processing sea snails.

Wayne Fowlie, plant manager at Premium Seafoods in Arichat, said the $96,000 will be used to purchase equipment needed to process the "underutilized species."

The money was announced Tuesday by Federal Fisheries Minister Jonathan Wilkinson.

Ottawa and the Nova Scotia government will spend $1.2 million on 11 different fisheries projects.

Premium Seafoods was rebuilt after a fire destroyed the old plant in 2013.

The new facility has mainly processed shrimp. However, the shrimp fishery has recently declined.

"We're always looking to expand our products and we're going to use all that money to help us do that," said Fowlie.

He said the investment in his plant will mean jobs for as many as 35 people.

"We have a population of young people down there and hopefully they'll see the benefits of having processing within the community and, you know, stay at home instead of leaving the community," said Fowlie.

Among the other projects to receive funding is Deep Vision Inc.

The Atlantic Fisheries Fund is giving that Nova Scotia company $48,000 to test and pilot a new camera system that can automatically locate North Atlantic right whales when they're near the surface of the ocean.

About the Author

Preston Mulligan has been a reporter in the Maritimes for more than 20 years. Along with his reporting gig, he also hosts CBC Radio's Sunday phone-in show, Maritime Connection.

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