Nova Scotia

Annapolis loses $400K fight with Kings Transit

The Nova Scotia Supreme Court has rejected a claim from Annapolis County for $404,884 from the Kings Transit Authority, which operates public transit in the Annapolis Valley including routes serving five communities in Annapolis County.

The Nova Scotia Supreme Court has rejected a claim from Annapolis County for $404,884 from the Kings Transit Authority, which operates public transit in the Annapolis Valley including routes serving five communities in Annapolis County.

The Municipality of the County of Annapolis was seeking $404,884 — a portion of the $1.76 million received between 2006 and 2010 by the Kings Transit Authority from the Federal Public Transit Capital Trust Fund.

The municipality claimed it received no benefit from that money, even though Annapolis County comprises 22 per cent of the ridership of the Kings Transit Authority.

Justice Gregory Warner ruled Kings Transit managers "spent the grant money on eligible capital projects that benefited the entire system."

"While Annapolis did not control the projects upon which the federal funds were expended, it received the same proportionate benefit from the projects as the other areas serviced by Kings Transit," Warner wrote in a decision released Monday.

Kings Transit spent the federal funds on the following eligible projects: five feeder buses, two used spare buses, security cameras, radios and fare boxes for every bus in the system and a new garage facility.

Approximately $1 million was used to acquire and set up the garage facility, which allowed the bus company to hire its own mechanics at half the hourly rate charged by private garages.

In the spring of 2012, the Municipality of the County of Annapolis served notice it was withdrawing from its agreement with Kings Transit. 

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