Nova Scotia

Accused Halifax spy's bail hearing postponed

The bail hearing of Jeffrey Paul Delisle, the Halifax navy intelligence officer accused of spying, has been put off until April 13.

Jeffrey Delisle's lawyer says Delisle's worried about his children

Sub.-Lt. Jeffrey Paul Delisle is escorted from provincial court in Halifax in January. (Andrew Vaughan/Canadian Press)

The bail hearing of Jeffrey Paul Delisle, the Halifax navy intelligence officer accused of spying, has been put off until April 13.

Delisle did not make a court appearance Tuesday morning in Halifax, according to the CBC's Rob Gordon.

He is accused of passing secrets to a foreign entity or terrorist group.

Delisle faces two charges of violating a section of the Security of Information Act.

The alleged incidents occurred between July 2007 and Jan. 10 or 13, 2012, in Ottawa, Kingston, Ont., Halifax and Bedford, N.S.

Delisle also faces one charge of breach of trust under the Criminal Code. The  Criminal Code charge can net a five-year prison sentence, and convictions under the Security of Information Act can lead to life in prison.

The 40-year-old sub-lieutenant in the Royal Canadian Navy is from the Bedford area of Halifax.

Delisle retained a new lawyer Monday, but Mike Taylor wouldn't say how his client will plead.

Defence lawyer Mike Taylor says there have been misconceptions about his client's charges. (CBC)

Taylor said the Crown is opposed to Delisle's release.

Delisle in jail

While Taylor didn't want to talk too much about the case because he was just familiarizing himself with it, he did comment on how his client is doing.

"Well, he's in jail, he's never been in jail before, it's a very difficult time for him emotionally," Taylor told reporters Tuesday morning. "He's got a lot to deal with. He's very concerned about his family, his children … that's taking a toll on him."

Taylor told reporters there has been some confusion about the charges against Delisle.

"I think there are a lot of misconceptions about what's going on ... they think that perhaps our troops have been put at risk, information about their movements and whereabouts and procedures in the field," Taylor said.

"This has nothing to do with the safety of troops."

With files from The Canadian Press

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