Nova Scotia

140 lobster traps collected at Victoria Mines beach cleanup

In addition to the 140 traps, the Cape Breton Environmental Association also dragged out abundant fishing rope and collected 18 bags of garbage, mostly plastics.

Cape Breton Environmental Association hosted event as part of ongoing effort to clean shoreline

The Cape Breton Environmental Association hosted the cleanup as part of an ongoing effort to clean the shorelines of the island. (Submitted by Cape Breton Environmental Association)

A beach cleanup in Victoria Mines, N.S., hauled up 140 discarded lobster traps from one kilometre of shoreline on Sunday.

Cape Breton Environmental Association hosted the cleanup as part of an ongoing effort to clean the shorelines of the island.

In addition to the 140 traps, the group also dragged out an abundance of fishing rope and collected 18 bags of garbage, mostly plastics. 

Dylan Yates, president of the association, said a resident of the area notified him of the marine debris cluttering the shoreline. He said he couldn't believe how much was covering the small stretch of beach.

"I was blown away with the amount of gear that was on this shoreline," he said. "It was by far the worst shoreline that we've come across."

Yates said the biggest issue with discarded fishing gear is the marine life that gets trapped in it, but it is also an issue for people who want to use beaches for enjoyment.

140 lobster traps were collected from one kilometre of shoreline during a beach cleanup in Victoria Mines, N.S., on Sunday. (Submitted by Cape Breton Environmental Association)

When the traps eventually come apart they can become hazardous because of the sharp wire edges and the bait spikes located inside.

Yates said to prevent such a large wash up of fishing gear the environmental association, communities and the fishing industry need to work together.

"We have a lot of knowledge to offer fishing associations.… We're open to collaboration if others are as well."

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