North

Yukon's May heatwave shatters records

A wave of hot, dry weather across Yukon this week set record high temperatures and has put much of the territory on high alert for forest fires.

From Haines Junction to Old Crow, temperature records fall

a fire near Dawson City in 2015 (Andreas Pohle/Yukon Wildland Fire Managment)

A wave of hot, dry weather across Yukon this week set record high temperatures and has put much of the territory on high alert for forest fires.

Dawson City reached a high of 27.5 C Saturday, smashing the old record of 21.2 C set in 1977, according to figures compiled by retired Whitehorse meteorologist David Millar.

Whitehorse hit 25 C, breaking a record high of 20.9 C set in 2011, while Faro (25.4 C) and Mayo (26.4) also broke records set in 2011.

Temperatures in Old Crow went up to 21.9 C, the hottest May 17 there since 1994. 

Teslin, Rock River and Beaver Creek also set record highs Saturday.

Fires caused by people amid elevated risk

The hot weather has raised the risk of forest fire in much of the territory. The fire danger rating remains at high or extreme in nine of Yukon's 10 fire districts.

Two small fires broke out Sunday. A fire caused by an abandoned campfire near Tagish was put out by firefighters and a helicopter. Another fire cause by careless burning near Haines Junction grew to 0.1 hectares, but is now contained, according to Wildland Fire Management.

Crews continue to fight a 38-hectare fire near the intersection of the Klondike and Dempster highways. Fire officials say that fire is contained and is no longer growing.

Crews also contained a small fire started by human activity at the south end of Lake Laberge Saturday. 

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