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Yukon Government tables bill to change vaping legislation

The Yukon Government has tabled a bill to address vaping. The proposed bill would replace the Yukon's current Smoke-Free Places Act, which does not pertain to vaping, with the Tobacco and Vaping Products Control and Regulation Act. 

Bill would replace Smoke-Free Places Act, which does not pertain to vaping

The Yukon Government proposed a bill to replace the Smoke-Free Places Act with legislation that includes vaping products.

The Yukon Government has tabled a bill to address vaping.

The proposed bill, brought forth by Health and Social Services Minister Pauline Frost in the first sitting of the fall legislature, would replace Yukon's current Smoke-Free Places Act, which does not pertain to vaping, with the Tobacco and Vaping Products Control and Regulation Act. 

The proposed legislation raises the minimum age of purchase for tobacco and vaping products to 19, and expands the current prohibitions on the display and promotion of tobacco products to vaping products.

The definition of a vaping product includes any substance intended to be used with an e-cigarette — including flavoured products — regardless of whether or not it contains nicotine. 

Vaping has made international news headlines lately due to a string of vaping-related illnesses. 

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website says there have been more than 1,000 lung injury cases reported and 18 confirmed deaths associated with using vaping products. In Canada, there has been at least one confirmed case of severe pulmonary illness related to vaping.  

 

With files from Chris Windeyer

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