North

Yukon First Nation partners with Habitat for Humanity

Yukon's Habitat for Humanity breaks ground on first ever housing project on First Nation settlement land.

Ground broken on Champagne and Aishihik First Nations housing project

The Champagne and Aishihik First Nations and the Yukon chapter of Habitat for Humanity broke ground today on a housing project for three families.

It’s the first time Habitat for Humanity has partnered with a Yukon First Nation, and the first time one of its projects has ever been built on settlement lands.

James Allen, Chief of the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, said partnering with Habitat for Humanity will help provide affordable home ownership options for the community. (CBC)

James Allen, Chief of the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, said projects like this and economic development are key to the future of his community.

"Partnering with Habitat for Humanity helps us make affordable home ownership options for some of our citizens who are not high on the income-making bracket," he said.

"Home ownership I see as one of those vehicles we can use to attain self-sufficiency for our people."

The project will include homes for three families to start but the goal is to accommodate 12 families within five years.

Arthur Mitchell, president of Habitat for Humanity Yukon, said the project is a helping hand up, not a hand out.

"We provide zero interest mortgages, so they're more affordable but there still is a need to have a job to continue to be able to make those payments."

The plan is to have the first three families move in by spring 2013.

now