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Yellowknife's Avens seniors centre welcomes anonymous $100K donation

A surprise donation from an anonymous Vancouver businessman will improve the quality of life for seniors at Yellowknife's Avens complex, say staff. 'Seniors are meant to be treasured,' says the anonymous benefactor, '...they give up so much of their life to the younger generation.'

'Seniors are meant to be treasured,' says anonymous benefactor

Kate Drexler currently offers therapy from a mobile sensory cart equipped with speakers, a large lava lamp and projector. Some of the donated money will go toward setting up a room devoted to sensory therapy. (CBC)

A surprise donation from an anonymous benefactor will improve the quality of life for seniors at Yellowknife's Avens complex, say staff.

A Vancouver businessman recently donated $100,000 to the centre.

"This is going to enable us to do so much more with our residents," said Avens CEO Stephen Jackson. "There are certain things we have not been able to afford."

Some of the money will go towards a sensory room for people with dementia.

Kate Drexler currently offers therapy from a mobile sensory cart equipped with speakers, a large lava lamp and projector. Relaxing lights, and sounds such as songbirds, help calm and comfort people with dementia.

"We can take this and set it up in individual rooms but it's a heavy cart," she said.

Avens CEO Stephen Jackson says the donation will 'enable us to do so much more with our residents,' he says. (CBC)

"Residents are in their room; we'd like to get them out."

A dedicated space will also mean being able to help more seniors at the same time.

The donor doesn't want to be named but says he travelled to Yellowknife for business and was touched by the community's kindness. Through a translator, he said he is of ethnic Chinese background and "believes seniors are meant to be treasured; they give up so much of their life to the younger generation."

Jackson said the money will also go toward a new space for foot care and a special sound system for bingo games in the rec room. 

"They will be able to hear, which is such an important part of participating and a sense of belonging," he said.

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