North

Wolves suspected of killing pets in N.W.T.'s Dehcho region

Mike Matou, chief of Nahanni Butte, N.W.T., says they've posted warning signs around the community and cancelled some evening programs due to reports of wolves in the area.

'They managed to snag four of the dogs in town,' says the chief of Nahanni Butte

Wildlife officers in Fort Simpson, N.W.T., are patrolling the community after two wolf sightings. (Submitted by Maxine Norwegian)

Wolves are causing problems in two communities in the Dehcho region of the N.W.T. 

Mike Matou, chief of Nahanni Butte, says wolves have captured and eaten several pets.

"Usually we have them hanging around the dump area, but one of the wolves started venturing into town and several weeks into their visit they managed to snag four of the dogs in town." 

People in Nahanni Butte, N.W.T., plan to clear brush from around homes so wolves have fewer places to hide. (Submitted by Jennifer Konisenta)

Matou says they've posted warning signs around the community and cancelled some evening programs. He says one man was able to trap the wolf they think was killing pets.

He hopes to capture the other two wolves who've been seen near the community.

Matou says they also plan to clear brush from around homes in the community so wolves have fewer places to hide.

'It wasn't even scared'

In one evening, Fort Simpson resident Maxine Norwegian spotted two wolves. She said the first stayed close to her idling vehicle for about a minute.

"It wasn't even scared," she said. "It just paced on the road, it didn't take off into the bush or anything.

Fort Simpson resident Maxine Norwegian snapped this shot of a wolf when she was out for a drive. (Submitted by Maxine Norwegian)

"Now I'm more aware. I'm always looking around me now," she said. 

She says people with young children are particularly worried about the sightings. 

Officers with the N.W.T. Department of Natural Resource in Fort Simpson are patrolling that community after two wolf sightings.

There haven't been any attacks so far, but conservation officers plan to shoot any wolves they see in town.

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