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Court dismisses Yukon wolf killer Clayton Thomas's appeal

The Yukon Supreme Court has dismissed an appeal from Clayton Thomas, a Tahltan First Nations man from Whitehorse who illegally killed wolves near his home in 2013.

Yukon Supreme Court judge finds no reason to overturn the conviction

The Yukon Supreme Court has dismissed an appeal from Clayton Thomas, a Tahltan First Nations man from Whitehorse who illegally killed wolves near his home in 2013. (CBC)

The Supreme Court of Yukon has dismissed an appeal from Clayton Thomas, a Tahltan First Nations man from Whitehorse who illegally killed wolves near his home in 2013.

Yukon Supreme Court judge Justice Leigh Gower ruled there's no reason to overturn the conviction against Thomas. 

"The appelant's argument can be reduced to an absurdity," wrote Justice Lee Gower in his decision. He went on to say that aspects of Thomas's court documents were "simply unintelligible."

In the original five-day trial, Thomas argued he had an Aboriginal right to hunt wolves near his Mount Sima property.

However, the court  found there was no evidence members of his First Nations historically hunted wolves or traded pelts in the Whitehorse area. 

Thomas was convicted of three charges — illegally hunting wolves, dangerous use of a firearm, and illegal trafficking. He had planned to sell the pelts. 

Thomas has been fined $6,500, he forfeits the wolf pelts seized, and is prohibited from hunting for two years except for subsistence.

with files from Vic Istchenko