North

Whitehorse teen's trial for stabbing death ends

The murder trial of a 17-year-old Whitehorse girl accused of stabbing her mother's ex-boyfriend to death wrapped up on Friday, with the verdict deferred until March.

The murder trial of a 17-year-old Whitehorse girl accused of stabbing her mother's ex-boyfriend to death wrapped up on Friday, with the verdict deferred until March.

The teen, who cannot be identified under the Youth Criminal Justice Act, is accused of stabbing the 56-year-old man a dozen times on Aug. 8, 2009. At the time, the man was residing in the home where the girl lived with her mother in Whitehorse's Crestview neighbourhood.

Closing arguments in the judge-only trial were heard Friday morning. Yukon territorial Judge John Faulkner said he will give his verdict on March 30.

The judge will have to decide whether the girl should be found guilty of second-degree murder or the less serious charge of manslaughter.

The defence has said the girl should be convicted of manslaughter, arguing that there is no evidence suggesting she had planned to kill the man.

Unwelcome house guest

Court has heard that the man was in a live-in relationship with the girl's mother, but he had become an unwelcome guest in their home in recent years.

The man had refused to move out of the house even after his relationship with the teen's mother was over. Court heard that the man stayed at home, drank beer and watched television most of the time.

The girl testified on Thursday that the man knew she disliked his constant presence, but he seemed to go out of his way to annoy her and invade her personal space.

The teen said by grabbing the knife, she wanted to just hurt him in order to send him a message that he was not welcome in her family's home. She said she could not remember all of what happened next.

A forensic psychiatrist testified that the girl's account is typical of people who fly into an uncontrollable rage and attack someone without being aware of their actions.

Knew what she was doing: Crown

But Crown prosecutors argued that there is no explanation of what triggered the teen's rage except for the fact that she did not like the man.

Prosecutors said the girl's subconscious likely blocked her memory of what happened, and she therefore might not have given an accurate account to the psychiatrist.

An autopsy report showed that the man was stabbed 12 times. His white T-shirt was drenched in blood, court was told.

The Crown argued that the girl's comments to her family and friends shortly after the stabbing indicate that she knew what she was doing.

Lawyers added that the girl, who was 16 at the time, ought to have known that stabbing someone 12 times would likely result in death.

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