North·Photos

Upside-down Antarctica iceberg looks blue

Alex Cornell, a filmmaker based in San Francisco, Calif., captured photos of a blue iceberg while on a recent trip to Antarctica.
Alex Cornell, a filmmaker based in San Francisco, Calif., captured photos of a blue iceberg while on a recent trip to Antarctica. (Alex Cornell)

Alex Cornell, a filmmaker based in San Francisco, Calif., captured photos of a blue iceberg while on a recent trip to Antarctica.

The iceberg appeared blue because it had flipped upside down. 

"Obviously I'm not a glacial scientist, but the icebergs typically, when they are surfaced, they have a white appearance because they are covered in snow," he said.

"The coolest part I thought was that you could see water and air bubbles peeking through it, which was wild because it made it seem alive, but there were also parts of it that were black."

Allison Devereaux speaks with Cornell about the iceberg Monday afternoon on CBC Radio's Trail's End. 

Alex Cornell, a filmmaker based in San Francisco, Calif., captured photos of a blue iceberg while on a recent trip to Antarctica. (Alex Cornell)

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