North

Seattle-bound flight forced to divert to Whitehorse

The Airbus 220-100 landed at Whitehorse after the crew noticed issues with the plane's auxiliary power system. Nobody was hurt, but passengers are in isolation at the Whitehorse airport.

No injuries reported but 18 passengers are in isolation as a COVID-19 precaution

Passengers are led from a Delta Air Lines jet to the terminal building at Whitehorse International Airport on May 30, 2020. The Airbus 220-100 diverted to Whitehorse after encountering problems with its auxiliary power unit during a flight between Fairbanks, Alaska, and Seattle. (Chris Windeyer/CBC)

A Delta Air Lines flight travelling from Fairbanks, Alaska, to Seattle made an unscheduled stop in Whitehorse Saturday.

Morgan Durrant, a spokesperson for Delta, said the Airbus 220-100 diverted to Whitehorse as a precaution and that none of the 18 passengers on board were injured.

"The flight crew of Delta flight 1327 from Fairbanks to Seattle observed a performance issue with the aircraft's auxiliary power unit," Durrant wrote in an email. Auxiliary power units provide energy to run systems on board an aircraft other than propulsion.

"Procedures call for a diversion to a nearby airport out of an abundance of caution. The aircraft landed in routine fashion at Whitehorse International Airport at about 9:35 am local time."

Passengers were escorted by airport staff from the plane across the tarmac to the terminal building. Most were wearing masks.

Brittanee Stewart, the assistant manager of Whitehorse International Airport, said the Canadian Border Services Agency was at the airport, but that passengers would not be allowed to leave the international lounge.

"We're working with the COVID-19 response team, CBSA and the air carrier to ensure that all the necessary regulations and measures are being adhered to," she said.

Stewart said another Delta jet was on its way to Whitehorse and she expected the passenger would depart by Saturday evening.

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