Sara Frizzell

Web Writer/Reporter

Sara Frizzell has been a reporter with CBC News in Iqaluit since February 2017. She's worked in radio, podcasting and longform journalism since graduating from Carleton University's journalism program in 2013. Contact her at sara.frizzell@cbc.ca

Latest from Sara Frizzell

The next antimalarial drug could come from fungus in Frobisher Bay, study finds

A chemical discovered in fungus from the bottom of Frobisher Bay, Nunavut, has shown promise in killing drug-resistant strains of malaria.

Twins from Nunavut have baby girls on the same day — including one set of twins

Chris Meeko’s daughter Leah Naulalik was born at 11 a.m. on May 30 with the help of a midwife in Rankin Inlet, Nunavut, and Christina Meeko’s twin girls Makaila and Brianna were born at 12 and 12:15 p.m. in a hospital in Winnipeg.

Proposed changes to Nunavut education act would phase in Inuktitut over next 20 years

The government of Nunavut is planning to push the deadline for it to provide bilingual Inuktitut-English education for grade 12 students 20 years down the line.

Auditor General gives Nunavut failing grade in supporting student career goals

The office of the Auditor General of Canada has found that Nunavut isn’t doing enough to help teens and adults further their education and achieve their career goals. The report was tabled on Tuesday in Nunavut’s Legislative Assembly.  

Another Nunavut man avoids mandatory minimum sentence for shooting a gun

Another Nunavut man has avoided a mandatory minimum sentence for shooting a gun, because a judge decided four years is cruel and unusual punishment for the crime.

U.S. university teaches students Inuktitut through funding prompted by Sputnik launch

At least a dozen students who have passed through the University of Washington in the last decade have some fluency in Inuktitut, thanks in part to investments in language education prompted by the launch of Sputnik.

Nunavut court overturns decision for mom who punched daughter

A mother won’t have a criminal record for repeatedly punching her daughter after the Nunavut Court of Justice overturned a decision by a community justice of the peace in Rankin Inlet. 

Meet the Inuk RCMP officer protecting Justin Trudeau

Const. George Henrie visited his home territory, Nunavut, as part of his job protecting the prime minister last week, when Justin Trudeau was in Iqaluit to apologize to Inuit for past government policies surrounding tuberculosis. 

After weather delays, Trudeau aims to deliver tuberculosis apology to Inuit Friday

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's ceremony to apologize to the Inuit for abuses suffered during tuberculosis treatment is now scheduled to happen Friday morning in in Iqaluit.

Trudeau expected to apologize on Thursday for treatment of Inuit with tuberculosis

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is expected to apologize Thursday for the way Inuit with tuberculosis were treated during the mid-20th century by the Canadian government.

Nunavut's new chief coroner was also the territory's first chief coroner

Elisapi Suluk Copland starts her job at the end of the month, but she first held the position from 1999 to 2001.

After 15 years, Iqaluit elder quits Ottawa medical care to die at home

Oqittuq Etuq returned home to Iqaluit this week to die surrounded by friends and family after he’d spent 15 years alone in Ottawa receiving dialysis treatment. The medical care is not available in Nunavut.

Nunavut gov't shares concerns with Competition Bureau on airline merger

The president of the northern air carrier First Air says a merger between his airline and Canadian North will provide the companies stability and passengers more departure times, but the government of Nunavut isn't sure that will come to pass.

Not a 'bad thing' if Nunavut sued over bilingual education, says lawyer

Anne Crawford says a lawsuit could provide some accountability and make the process of training teachers more public.

Arctic airlines say Competition Bureau recommendations show southern 'ignorance'

The Competition Bureau says if two Arctic airlines — Canadian North and First Air — merge, it's likely that prices would increase, passenger and cargo capacity would go down and there would be fewer flights.