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RCMP apologize after officer was asked to leave to Fort Good Hope, N.W.T., says chief

Chief Danny Masuzumi said an inspector with the RCMP’s G Division travelled to Fort Good Hope, N.W.T. Wednesday to apologize after the police force received harsh criticism from the community after it came to light that local officer, Const. Randy McKay, had pleaded guilty to sexual assault five years ago.

Const. Randy McKay was 'afforded leave' after community found out he had pleaded guilty to 2015 sexual assault

Fort Good Hope Chief Danny Masuzumi says an RCMP inspector travelled to the community Wednesday to apolgize after it came to light Const. Randy McKay had pleaded guilty to a 2015 sexual assault. (CBC)

The chief of Fort Good Hope, Northwest Territories says his community's trust with the RCMP has been partially restored.

Chief Danny Masuzumi said an inspector with the RCMP's G Division travelled to Fort Good Hope Wednesday to apologize after the national police force received harsh criticism from the community after it came to light that local officer, Const. Randy McKay, had pleaded guilty to sexual assault five years ago. 

McKay was charged and pleaded guilty to sexual assault in 2015 while stationed in Buffalo Narrows, Sask. He was given a conditional discharge meaning if he completed 12 months of probation his record would be erased. 

Chief Danny Masuzumi says there is now a 'calmness' in his community of Fort Good Hope after the RCMP apology. (Alex Brockman/CBC)

"They were disappointed this happened and kind of embarrassed. They apologized for this happening but it is what it is," Masuzumi said.

"We both said what we had to say and we left on good terms."

McKay left the community on May 16 after being "afforded leave" by the RCMP, according to a police spokesperson. Masuzumi said he was told during his meeting with Insp. Dyson Smith that McKay would not be returning to Fort Good Hope.

Masuzumi said he was told the force is still discussing what McKay's future will be with the RCMP.

RCMP confirmed the meeting between Insp. Smith and Masuzumi took place but wouldn't comment on what was discussed.

"They told me he won't be coming back to the community and they're going to be finding something else for him to do," Masuzumi said.

Masuzumi told CBC that the RCMP's apology helped restore trust between the community and the police force, at least somewhat.

"The storm has passed and so there's calmness in the community now," he said. 

"We're just going to try and work with the detachment here in the community."

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