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Conservation officers track bear in Whitehorse's Porter Creek neighbourhood

Yukon conservation officers are warning people in Whitehorse about a bear that's been seen wandering in the Porter Creek neighbourhood.

Residents asked to keep children close or inside, and pets tied up or inside as well

Conservation officers in Yukon say bears are busy these days foraging, so people should be cautious even in their backyards. (Yukon government)

Yukon conservation officers are warning people in Whitehorse about a black bear that's been seen wandering in the Porter Creek neighbourhood.

An advisory issued on Monday said officers were tracking the animal. It was seen at Jack Hulland School on Monday morning, and later at nearby Holy Family School on Wann Road.

Conservation officer Ken Knutson described it as a "small" bear moving through the neighbourhood.

"We had hoped that it was going to keep moving through, but unfortunately it found some garbage in the back of a trailer that caught its interest and it got into that," Knutson said. 

He said early Monday afternoon that the bear had moved off into the Hidden Lakes area in the middle of Porter Creek, and officers were trying to push it toward the greenbelt.

"It's right in the centre of Porter Creek. So not a good place for a bear to be."

Residents in the area were asked to keep their children close or inside. Pets should be tied up or brought inside as well, the advisory says.

Residents are also asked to make sure garbage, recycling and compost are securely contained.

'It's just that time of year when bears are wandering everywhere,' said conservation officer Ken Knutson. (CBC)

Knutson says people should be mindful that bears are very busy foraging this time of year. He said there have been other recent reports of bears in Porter Creek and Copper Ridge neighbourhoods.

"It's just that time of year when bears are wandering everywhere," he said.

"I think what these bears show us is that anywhere in Whitehorse there's a real potential to have a bear come into your backyard."

He advises anybody who spots a bear to call conservation officer services at 1-800-661-0525.

"The quicker we can get on some of these things the better, so we can prevent conflicts. That's what we'd rather do," Knutson said.

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