North

Water services restored as premier, MLAs set to visit Hay River, Kátł'odeeche First Nation

Water services are being restored in Hay River, N.W.T., as the premier, minister of municipal and community affairs, and MLAs for Hay River and the Dehcho region prepare to visit the flood-stricken community on Monday.

Premier, MACA minister, MLAs plan to meet with leaders, survey the damage

Lift station No. 1, which services much of Hay River, N.W.T., was almost entirely submerged during flooding earlier this month. Town officials reported it was back online Sunday. (Submitted by Jane Groenewegen)

Water services are being restored in Hay River, N.W.T., as the premier, minister of municipal and community affairs, and MLAs for Hay River and the Dehcho region prepare to visit the flood-stricken community on Monday.

Lift Station No. 1, which serves much of the town, was brought back online Sunday after "extensive electrical and mechanical work" was completed over the weekend.

The lift station was almost completely submerged during flooding earlier this month.

"Thanks to our local electrical and mechanical contractors and members of the Public Works department who have worked tirelessly to restore the lift station services to date," reads an update from the Town of Hay River around 5 p.m. Sunday. 

Town officials had earlier called a restoration this weekend the "best-case scenario," anticipating significant extensions to the timeline if it was not successful. The lift station will be monitored this week as more repairs are needed. 

The town expected water to be back on in homes by early evening Sunday, and asked people to call 867-875-7137 if water issues persist. A boil water advisory remains in place, and discolouration of the water is expected. 

Only Paradise Gardens remains without water and sewer services as engineers work on temporary road access so that water and sewage trucks can gain access. The power distribution network is online, though some properties require electrical inspections, the town said.

Sunday's update from the town also said Fort Simpson, N.W.T., had donated fans, dehumidifiers and shop vacs, which residents can check out at the donation centre.

Around 200 applications for assistance

Hay River Mayor Kandis Jameson said on Saturday that around 200 applications had been made so far for territorial disaster assistance.

"That's a lot of homes," she said. 

Hay River Mayor Kandis Jameson said there's still more to be done, and some homes remain unlivable. (Samantha Stuart Photography)

The total cost of the damage to homes and infrastructure, however, is still to be determined. 

Jameson commended the South Slave emergency management organization for its help with the evacuation, arranging for assessors to come into the town, and other work.

She said there's still much more to be done, and some homes remain unlivable.

The town's big priorities, said Jameson, are ensuring everyone has access again to power, water and sewer services, and roads, as well as helping residents with damaged homes get the support they need. 

"We have to exhaust all our resources, and then we exhaust all the [N.W.T. government] resources, and then we go federally," she said.

Jameson also praised the territory at large. 

"I can't say enough about the support that we've received," she said.

"Businesses stepping up, individuals — it's just phenomenal the outpouring of support that we're receiving from around this territory and within the community."

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Sidney Cohen

Journalist

Sidney Cohen is a reporter with CBC North in Yellowknife.

With files from Sara Minogue

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