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Nunavut posts more COVID-19 recoveries than new cases for 2nd day in a row

Nunavut reported more recoveries than new cases of COVID-19 on both Saturday and Sunday this week. All cases are now concentrated in Iqaluit.

There are now 72 active cases of COVID-19 in Nunavut, all in the capital

Nunavut reported more recoveries than new cases of COVID-19 on both Saturday and Sunday this week. All cases are now concentrated in Iqaluit. (NIAID Integrated Research Facility/Reuters)

Nunavut Premier Joe Savikataaq announced five new cases of COVID-19 in Iqaluit on Twitter Sunday. 

But with seven recoveries, the number of active cases has now declined to 72, all in Iqaluit. 

It's the second day in a row the territory counted more recoveries than new cases. 

But COVID-19 continues to wreak havoc in the capital. 

The Iqaluit Elders' Home was closed on Saturday, and residents were moved out of the facility after staff members were exposed to COVID-19. 

On Friday, CBC News learned a client of the city's men's shelter had tested positive, prompting concern from the executive director of the society that runs the shelter about what would happen next. 

In a news briefing Friday morning, the territory's chief public health officer said house parties and visiting were now the main source of spread of the virus. 

Dr. Michael Patterson asked anyone who had attended a house party in the city in the last three weeks to call the territory's COVID-19 hotline and request a test. The number for the hotline is 975-8601 or 1-888-975-8601.

While Iqaluit is the only Nunavut community facing an outbreak of COVID-19, there is one other outbreak in the territory. 

Baffinland Iron Mines announced May 5 it was temporarily suspending operations at its Mary River Project amid an outbreak of COVID-19. As of Thursday, that outbreak included 23 positive cases.

However, none of the people who tested positive are residents of the territory. Baffinland sent home its Nunavut workforce in March of 2020 to avoid spreading COVID-19 into Nunavut's vulnerable communities. 

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