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Nunavut government extends public health emergency to May 14

Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Michael Patterson said the territory is starting to look at what loosening some of the public health restrictions might look like. He said likely, one of the first services to reopen will be daycares.

The territory's top doctor and premier provided an update Wednesday at 3 p.m. ET

Dr. Michael Patterson, Nunavut's chief public health officer, gave an update on COVID-19 in the territory on Wednesday. (CBC)

The Nunavut government has extended the territory's public health emergency to May 14, meaning restrictions on public gatherings and workplaces will continue.

On Wednesday, Premier Joe Savikataaq updated the public on the territory's response to COVID-19, along with the territory's Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Michael Patterson. 

Patterson said the territory is starting to look at what loosening some of the public health restrictions might look like. He said likely, one of the first services to reopen will be daycare centres.

But before restrictions are lifted, Patterson said certain criteria must be met.

He said the territory must put in place a "rapid and comprehensive" COVID-19 testing program; COVID-19 infection rates must be decreasing in jurisdictions to which Nunavummiut most often travel, namely, in Quebec, Northwest Territories, Alberta, Manitoba and Ontario; and there must be no active COVID-19 cases in Nunavut.

Missed the press conference? Watch it in full here:

On Monday, Patterson announced a revised public health order banning all gatherings of more than five people.

He said this does not mean restrictions are being lightened, and it's still safest to only spend time with people who are in your household. 

There are no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Nunavut.

As of Wednesday, the territory is waiting for 219 people to be cleared or get their COVID-19 test results, while 361 people who were investigated are confirmed to be COVID-19-free.

You can be tested if you show any of the following symptoms: cough, fever or difficulty breathing.

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