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Number of search and rescues on the rise in Nunavut

The number of people needing help from Nunavut's search and rescue associations nearly doubled in 2013 compared to 2012, according to annual reports from Nunavut Emergency Management.

41% due to mechanical breakdowns or running out of fuel

A Cormorant helicopter from Joint Task Force Atlantic prepares to pick up a group of hunters stranded on an ice floe near Coral Harbour, Nunavut, in January. The number of people needing help from search and rescue organizations nearly doubled in 2013 compared to 2012, according to annual reports from Nunavut Emergency Management. (@JTFAtlantic/Twitter)

The number of people needing help from search and rescue personnel nearly doubled in 2013 compared to 2012, according to annual reports from Nunavut Emergency Management.

In 2012, there were 178 searches, looking for 275 people. In 2013, there were 222 searches, looking for 493 people.

Forty-one per cent of searches were the result of mechanical breakdown of equipment, or running out of fuel.

Spring saw the highest number of searches. The month of May saw the most incidents in 2013 and the second-most in 2012.

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