North

Northerners headed out to see the solar eclipse. Here's how it turned out

It was a particularly special solar event as the annular eclipse, which refers to the ring of the sun that became visible around the moon for a few moments, won't happen again for another several years.

In Inuvik, the clouds hid the eclipse. Though disappointing, local teacher says there was still a bright side

CJ Parr is a high school teacher at East Three Secondary School. He teaches science, physics and math and helped put together a solar eclipse viewing party in Inuvik, N.W.T. (Mackenzie Scott/CBC)

Northerners went out to catch a glimpse of a burning ring of fire in the sky during the recent solar eclipse early Thursday morning.

It was a particularly special solar event as the annular eclipse, which refers to the ring of the sun that became visible around the moon for a few moments, won't happen again for another several years.

In Inuvik, N.W.T., two high school teachers at East Three Secondary School, CJ Parr and Michael Bodnar, put on a viewing event for the community, particularly for students, to view the eclipse using Parr's telescope. Special glasses needed to watch the solar event were provided as well. 

Students in Inuvik wear special glasses to view the solar eclipse. Teachers at a local high school put on the event and even brought a telescope for the viewing. (Mackenzie Scott/CBC)

But in Inuvik, the clouds hid the main attraction. Parr said even though missing it was a disappointment, the morning still brought a reward.

Parr, who teaches science, physics and math, said he's been interested since he was 16 years old, when he got his first telescope — but he wasn't expecting as much enthusiasm from others.

About 70 students and about 100 people came throughout the event.

"I'm kind of surprised how many kids came … it makes me excited, especially seeing my students out since I feel like they are more excited about this than my actual class," Parr said with a laugh.

"Maybe I'll inspire people to join my passion of astronomy even though we didn't really get to see anything."

He added that the next opportunity in the region to see an eclipse will be in 2039, when it will be viewable in Tuktoyaktuk, or along the Tuk highway.

About 70 students and about 100 people came throughout the event. Special glasses needed to watch the eclipse were also provided. (Mackenzie Scott/CBC)

Meanwhile in the Yukon, people were able to catch a glimpse of the eclipse between 3:45 a.m. and 4 a.m. Thursday morning, including Elaine Schiman, who captured photos from the Midnight Dome in Dawson City.

The solar eclipse as seen from the Midnight Dome in Dawson City, Yukon, between 3:45 a.m. and 4:30 a.m. This viewing method allows people to see the eclipse without looking directly at it, which could cause eye damage. (Submitted by Elaine Schiman)
A view of the solar eclipse taken from the Midnight Dome in Dawson City, Yukon. (David Millar)

And it was a moody sky in Iqaluit, but the eclipse was seen all the same.

A view of the solar eclipse in Iqaluit as seen by CBC videographer David Gunn. (David Gunn/CBC)

With files from Mackenzie Scott and Meral Jamal

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