North

No publication ban for Whitehorse murder trial

Yukon Supreme Court turned down a request for a publication ban on an upcoming murder trial. The judge decided the ban would not be necessary since jurors have been able to make fair decisions even in high-profile cases with massive amounts of publicity.

Norman Larue’s lawyer tried to argue jurors could be prejudiced against Larue because of separate trial

Yukon Supreme Court turned down a request for a publication ban for an upcoming murder trial.

Two people are charged - Christina Marie Asp and Norman Larue - and they will be tried separately.

Larue asked for the details from Asp’s trial to be kept under a publication ban until his trial gets underway. He tried to argue that potential jurors might be prejudiced if they hear details about the case before his own court case.

The trial stems from the 2008 murder of Gordon Seybold in Whitehorse. His body was found in the ashes of his home.

Nearly a year and a half later, Christina Marie Asp and Norman Larue were arrested in Alberta and charged with murder.

Asp will go to trial next week.

Larue's case won't be heard until the fall. Larue's lawyer asked the court for a complete publication ban on any details about next week’s trial.

Supreme Court Justice Leigh Gower disagreed with Larue’s lawyer – he said Larue's lawyer failed to provide any evidence to back up his claims that jurors could be prejudiced.

Gower said Canadian courts, including the Supreme Court of Canada, have ruled publication bans should only be issued as a last resort. Gower added that juries have been able to return fair decisions even in high-profile cases with massive amounts of publicity.   

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