North

Nearby muskoxen set Grise Fiord, Nunavut, residents on edge

The mayor of Grise Fiord, Nunavut's northernmost civilian community, is warning people about two muskoxen near the community.

Child in the community was injured a decade ago by charging muskox

Two muskoxen have been spotted grazing near Grise Fiord, Nunavut. (submitted by Joanne Dignard)

The mayor of Grise Fiord, Nunavut's northernmost civilian community, is warning people about two muskoxen near the community.

The two have been seen grazing near the hamlet, and one was spotted near the runway.

Mayor Meeka Kigutak says muskoxen are very territorial.

She says they appear to be on a migration route and may naturally move away from the hamlet, but if they get closer to town instead, residents can hunt them. 

"The wildlife office has advised us that anyone in our community can catch the two muskox."

Kigutak says the community of Grise Fiord is already a little on edge after a woman was tracked into town by a malnourished polar bear this winter.

More than a decade ago, a child was injured in the hamlet when a muskox charged after it was teased.

Grise Fiord residents were already on edge after a woman was tracked into town by a malnourished polar bear this winter. (submitted by Joanne Dignard)

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