Nancy Thomson

Raised in Ross River, Yukon, Nancy Thomson is a graduate of Ryerson University's journalism program. Her first job with CBC Yukon was in 1980, when she spun vinyl on Saturday afternoons. She rejoined CBC Yukon in 1993, and focuses on First Nations issues and politics. You can reach her at nancy.thomson@cbc.ca.

Latest from Nancy Thomson

Yukon's Campbell highway still in rough shape, after gov't promised to fix it up

Yukon's highways minister said a year ago that the government had committed $500,000 for design work to re-build the Campbell Highway between Ross River and Faro. But people in Ross River are now asking, 'where's the beef?'

Ross River Dena Council wants a new school, just not where the current one is

The Yukon minister of education and minister of public works met privately with the Ross River Dena Council last week. The First Nation told the government it wants a new school - but not anywhere near the old one.

New Yukon NDP leader wants to 'smash expectations and stereotypes'

Kate White, a 42-year-old former baker who calls herself 'the most unlikely of all politicians,' officially took over as leader at the party's annual gathering on Saturday.

Buy us out, says tax-addled MacBride Museum to Yukon government

The MacBride Museum Society passed a unanimous resolution at its annual general meeting on Tuesday, saying it's willing to sell its land and building in Whitehorse.

Yukon gov't to implement all recommendations made in group home investigation

Minister Pauline Frost issued a statement in response to an investigation into allegations of wrongdoing in Yukon group homes, saying that her government will implement all the recommendations made by the territory's Public Interest Disclosure Commissioner.

Yukon gov't staff violated child protection laws at youth group home, commissioner finds

The Yukon Public Interest Disclosure Commissioner's investigation was launched after some government employees alleged wrongdoing in how youth group homes were being operated.

Plans for cooling system under Ross River school put on ice

The Yukon government issued a tender for a refrigeration unit and insulation in the school's crawl space, to attempt to refreeze the thawing permafrost under the building. There was only one bid, and the government says it's too expensive.

'Be extra careful' in the bush right now, warn Yukon wildfire experts

Warm temperature records across Yukon for the last few weeks has resulted in the snow melting early. Wildlife experts say this is a time that calls for extra caution.

'We all stand with her': Yukon AFN chief on Wilson-Raybould

'The leadership that she has shown as a woman, as an Indigenous woman, as a former attorney general — you know, there probably aren't words to describe how truly remarkable she is,' says Kluane Adamek.

70 people show support for Many Rivers counselling services over weekend

Dozens of people went out in Whitehorse on Sunday to express their support for Many Rivers Counselling and Support Services. Many want the Yukon gov't to 'step up' and show leadership for the health service.

Yukon unveils new policy for awarding government contracts

The new policy comes into effect April 1 and includes a new definition of what constitutes a Yukon business.

Yukon's rural communities say emergency shelters needed in cold weather

'Two days in a row, we actually had men knock at our door, begging us for a place to stay,' said Rhonda Koch, who works at a women's shelter in Watson Lake.

Yukon gov't defeats own bill to redraw electoral boundaries, add another MLA

Yukon opposition parties are shaking their heads after the territorial government defeated its own bill to change electoral riding boundaries in the territory.

Yukon premier grilled over leaked documents on carbon tax

The territorial government has promised rebate cheques to Yukoners, once they start paying a carbon tax next July. But businesses may end up with tax credits instead. Opposition MLAs want Premier Sandy Silver to clarify what businesses can expect.

Yukon trucking company worried about impacts of carbon tax

The president of Pacific Northwest, one of the Yukon's largest transportation companies, says he needs information on how rebates will work. He also wonders why aviation and placer mining are exempt, but trucking companies aren't.