North

N.W.T. fires expected to flare up with hot, dry weather

Weather conditions over the next few days are expected to significantly increase the number of forest fires in N.W.T. and additional aircraft and fire crews are being brought in.

Additional aircraft and fire crews being brought in

A fire burns near Aklavik, N.W.T., earlier in June. Weather conditions over the next few days are expected to increase the number of forest fires in the territory. (NWT Fire)

Hot, dry weather in most of the Northwest Territories over the next few days is expected to significantly increase the number of forest fires in the region.

In anticipation of more fires, the territorial government says it's commissioning extra air tankers and fire personnel.

There are currently 45 firefighters working on wildfires in the Northwest Territories.

There have been 76 forest fires in the territory so far this season. That's about double the 25-year average for this time of year.

Extra firefighters from Fort Providence, Fort Resolution and Fort Smith were trained by the N.W.T. Department of Environment and Natural Resources last week near Fort Smith. (NWT Fire)

"We are pretty much over any of the cool type of weather," fire operations manager Richard Olsen said on Monday.

"We are expecting to move into some real significant hot, dry conditions into the weekend. Coming with that though are a series of embedded troughs that are going to bring moisture and lightning so we are expecting the conditions exist again for another series of fire occurrences through the weekend."

Temperatures are expected to hit 30 C in much of the Northwest Territories over the next week.

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