North

Magnitude 6.0 quake hits south of Alaska Peninsula

A magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck to the south of the Alaska peninsula early on Thursday, but the National Weather Service said no tsunami warning has been issued.

No tsunami warning issued, says National Weather Service

A magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck to the south of the Alaska peninsula about 100 kilometres south-southwest of Sand Point, Alaska. (USGS Earthquake Hazards Program )

A magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck to the south of the Alaska peninsula early on Thursday, but the National Weather Service said no tsunami warning has been issued.

The quake was centred about 100 kilometres south-southwest of Sand Point, Alaska, at a depth of 17 kilometres according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

"No tsunami warning, advisory, watch or threat," said officials from the National Weather Service, a unit of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The quake was far milder than a magnitude 7.9 earthquake that struck the Gulf of Alaska in January, triggering tsunami alerts for the U.S. West Coast and Canada, as well as spurring evacuations in coastal Alaska and warnings as far south as California.

The largest earthquake ever recorded in the United States was also in Alaska, a magnitude 9.2 temblor in March 1964, causing tidal waves of more than 30 metres high that killed 131 people.

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