North

New Iqaluit dump 2 years behind schedule

The current dump, along Iqaluit's West 40 area, was supposed to close this year. Two years ago when a new $35-million waste sorting facility and dump was announced the landfill was at capacity. 

The current city dump was set to close this year

City Coun. Romeyn Stevenson says the new dump should be up and running by 2023. (David Gunn/CBC)

Construction of the new Iqaluit city dump is two years behind schedule. 

The current dump, along the West 40, was supposed to close this year. Two years ago, when a new $35-million waste sorting facility and dump was announced, the landfill was at capacity. 

"I think that you know the 2020 date that we had was very specific to the fact that we had no more space in that landfill," said Coun. Romeyn Stevenson. "It was an emergency to be able to open something else up." 

But Stevenson says the landfill is no longer in an emergency situation for now — a fire in the dump made room for the city to "re-engineer" some of the existing space to keep it open longer. By changing how the garbage is piled, Stevenson said the space will last for two more years. 

"[The new pile] is not blowing down the bay like it was two years ago and blowing out into the park land like it was two years ago," Stevenson said. 

The new landfill will be about six kilometres from upper base and a new road will need to be built to get there. A 20,000 square-foot sorting centre will be built in the 1800 block area of Kakivak Court. 

A fire in the dump made room to allow the city to “re-engineer” some of the existing space to keep it open longer. (David Gunn/CBC)

The facility will sort garbage taking out recycling to be sent south for processing. The garbage to go to the landfill will be wrapped in plastic blocks and put on trucks to be taken to the dump. The blocks are to keep the garbage from polluting the land. 

Right now, all of the city's garbage is taken to the dump and essentially thrown off the back of the truck. Some sorting to remove things like metal and cardboard is done.

The city recently moved the fire training centre from where the sorting centre will be built, to across the street from the West 40 dump, something that needed to happen in order to start work. 

Stevenson says in the spring the city will send out tenders for construction work and begin the regulatory process with the Nunavut Water Board with hopes of construction starting this summer. 

"Re-engineering that space [the old dump] allowed us the time to move the date and being more careful about making sure we get the landfill that we need," said Stevenson. 

The city hopes to have the new garbage facility up and running by 2023. As for the old landfill, it will be remediated and covered in grass.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jackie McKay

Reporter

Jackie McKay is a Métis journalist working for CBC in Nunavut. She has worked as a reporter in Thunder Bay, Yellowknife, Whitehorse and Iqaluit. Jackie also worked on CBC Radio One shows including The Current, Metro Morning, after graduating from Ryerson University in 2017. Follow her on Twitter @mckayjacqueline.

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