North

Iqaluit man declared a dangerous offender

A Nunavut judge has declared an Iqaluit man a dangerous offender, making him the second to receive that designation in the territory's 10-year history.

A Nunavut judge has declared an Iqaluit man a dangerous offender, making him the second to receive that designation in the territory's 10-year history.

Jimmy Partridge has been convicted of 47 crimes — including eight sexual offences, mainly targeting children — over a 26-year period, according to a written decision by Nunavut court Justice Robert Kilpatrick.

Kilpatrick's ruling, dated Monday but released Wednesday, stated that Partridge poses a substantial risk of reoffending. The public, especially children, stand to be harmed if he remains at large, the decision stated.

"It's really reserved for kind of the worst of the worst," Crown prosecutor Leo Lane told CBC News on Wednesday of the dangerous offender status.

"It was the correct decision and, in our opinion, society is safer because of it."

Partridge becomes the second Nunavummiut to be designated a dangerous offender since Nunavut became a territory in 1999. That year, Tommy Veevee became Nunavut's first dangerous offender.

Diagnosed as pedophile, schizophrenic

According to the decision, Partridge spent much of the past 14 years in jail, psychiatric institutions and homeless shelters. He has assaulted police, correctional officers and other inmates before.

Partridge has been diagnosed as a pedophile and suffers from schizophrenia and a personality disorder with anti-social traits, according to the decision.

He has refused to take medication or therapy for his sexual offences, and has shown no remorse, Kilpatrick wrote.

"In view of this citizen's special needs and his long psychiatric history, this court strongly recommends that Mr. Partridge be considered for long-term placement at a forensic psychiatric facility maintained by Corrections Canada," Kilpatrick wrote in his ruling.

Lack of resources in Nunavut

"This citizen has strange mannerisms. He is easily irritated and highly unpredictable. He will not fare well within the general population of a high-security institution."

Kilpatrick added that Partridge's special needs had remained unaddressed for years because of a lack of resources in Nunavut.

"More citizens will likely follow Jimmy Partridge unless there is a sustained commitment to properly resource early therapeutic intervention and long-term support options for Nunavummiut in need," the judge wrote.

In addition to sending Partridge to a forensic psychiatric facility, Kilpatrick added that Partridge's parole eligibility should be reviewed in three years, then every two years after that.

now