A stand-up solution? Indoor farm walls touted in Inuvik, N.W.T.

The organization that operates Inuvik's greenhouse is pondering the use of indoor farm walls.

Community's greenhouse hosting display of technology this week

Eric Amyot, CEO and co-founder of Modular Farms, sets up a wall inside Inuvik's greenhouse. (CBC)

The organization that operates Inuvik's greenhouse is pondering the use of indoor farm walls.

"Instead of having this minimum 1,300-kilometre travel for fruits and vegetables, we could actually be having stuff that is from farm to table very quickly," said Ray Solotki, executive director of the Inuvik Community Greenhouse.

A farm wall consists of a series of plastic columns that hang on a wall - 'much like hanging a piece of art,' says Amyot. (Modular Farms )

"It is something that can be used now to help us with our food security issues. [It's] not something we will need to do more studies on, just something we can set up and hit the ground running."

A farm wall consists of a series of plastic columns that hang on a wall. It works using hydroponics, a method that allows people to grow plants in nutrient-rich water instead of soil. Water circulates through the columns, providing irrigation.

"Usually they are found indoors because of our climate here in Canada," said Eric Amyot, CEO and co-founder of Modular Farms, which makes farm walls.

"[They're] typically mounted to a wall using a bracket system. Much like hanging a piece of art."

Ray Solotki, executive director of Inuvik Community Greenhouse (CBC)

Public presentation at greenhouse

Amyot said the units are not difficult to maintain and easy to build.

"The great thing about it is that it could be adopted by anybody. There's no required degree or knowledge of agriculture or indoor agriculture or hydroponics at all," he said.

Gardeners won't be able to grow certain produce such as potatoes, corn or onions on a farm wall. But the units can grow lettuce, peas, peppers and cucumbers.

The Inuvik greenhouse will hold a public presentation on farm walls Thursday at the Inuvik library from 6 to 8 p.m.