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Inuit still less than 25% of all managers in Nunavut government

Inuit employment in the Government of Nunavut remains at 50 per cent overall, according to December 2014 numbers released by the territory's Department of Finance.

New leadership strategy coming, says deputy minister of Finance

Inuit employment in the Government of Nunavut remains at 50 per cent, according to December 2014 numbers released by the territory's Department of Finance. In Iqaluit, Inuit made up 35 per cent of Government of Nunavut employees. (The Canadian Press)

Inuit employment in the Government of Nunavut remains at 50 per cent overall, according to December 2014 numbers released by the territory's Department of Finance.

That number falls short of reflecting Nunavut's population, which is 85 per cent Inuit, but the real shortcomings are in middle and senior management, where Inuit hold less than a quarter of all jobs.

The Sivuliqtiksat Program, which provides on-the-job training for beneficiaries who want to work in management, has been in place since 2001. 

Ronnie Suluk, manager of Community Mining and Engagement in Arviat, went through the program, like his mother before him.

Suluk says three years in the internship program played a big part in where he is today, "with a lot of help from my co-workers and my supervisor who were able to take their time and ensure that I get the whole thing down on how the industry and government works," he said.

"Now I think I have a good future with the GN."

The most recent report says the program has a total of 16 positions available, 10 of which are filled.

Overall, 75 per cent of the Government of Nunavut's available jobs were staffed in December 2014.

Chris D'Arcy, Nunavut's deputy minister of Finance, says the government is doing what it can.

"Inuit employment plans are in effect with each and every department," he said.

"We have the priority hiring policy. We have a new leadership strategy that we are just about to roll out." 

He said the new strategy will consist of three-day courses every six to eight weeks for future managers and supervisors. It will include Inuit societal values and last until summer 2016. 

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