North

Igloolik businessman found liable for sex assault has yet to pay plaintiffs

Four plaintiffs in a successful Nunavut civil case ordering damages for sexual assault are still waiting for prominent Igloolik businessman Ike Haulli to pay their court-ordered compensation. 

Ike Haulli was ordered to pay more than $1M to 4 plaintiffs

Ike Haulli told the court Monday he had no money as the attention paid to the court process resulted in him losing his business contracts. (CBC)

Four plaintiffs in a successful Nunavut civil case ordering damages for sexual assault are still waiting for prominent Igloolik businessman Ike Haulli to pay their court-ordered compensation. 

Haulli lost a civil court case in the spring of 2018 and was ordered to pay the plaintiffs more than $1 million. 

In the more than a year since the civil judgment, Haulli has not paid what he owes. 

The plaintiffs, who accused Haulli in their statement of claim of sexually abusing them when they were children, were awarded between $225,000 and $370,000 each in damages. Their identities are protected by a publication ban. 

The threshold for proof in civil court is lower than criminal court, which requires charges be proved beyond a reasonable doubt. 

Justice Earl Johnson stated in his 2018 decision: "I am satisfied on a balance of probabilities that the defendant sexually assaulted the plaintiffs as alleged in the statements of claim and is liable to them." 

One of the plaintiffs faced Haulli in criminal court in 2008, where he pleaded guilty to having sex with someone younger than 14 — an old charge since updated in Canada's Criminal Code.

He was given no jail time and received a suspended sentence and 12 months probation.

Haulli was acquitted in a criminal case involving another plaintiff, and charges were stayed in the criminal case involving the third plaintiff.

Lawyers to review Haulli's finances

As Haulli has not yet paid the damages, the plaintiffs' lawyer Jenna Broomfield appeared by telephone in the Nunavut Court of Justice on Monday to ask Justice Susan Cooper for a financial review. 

Haulli, who also appeared by telephone, agreed to provide a financial statement to Broomfield by Monday, though he told the judge he had no money, as he said he lost his business contracts because of the attention paid to the court process.

Cooper also set a date for what is called an examination of aid, where should the lawyers have questions about his financial statement they can ask Haulli while he is under oath. 

The examination will determine what money or assets Haulli might have to satisfy the payment owed. 

Haulli is expected to attend court  — again by telephone from Igloolik — for this purpose on Feb. 12.