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Franklin expedition's HMS Erebus artifacts go on display in Gatineau

Artifacts recovered from the High Arctic wreck of the Franklin expedition's HMS Erebus go on display at the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau, Que., today through the Victoria Day long weekend.

Items recovered in April dive are on exhibit May 14-18 at Museum of History

Artifacts recovered from the High Arctic wreck of the Franklin expedition's HMS Erebus go on display at the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau, Que., today through the Victoria Day long weekend.

The artifacts were recovered during the April expedition by Parks Canada and Royal Canadian Navy divers.

They include one of the ship's two six-pounder bronze cannons, buttons from jackets of the Royal Marines, personal effects such as a medicine bottle, plates and glassware.

For conservation reasons, the artifacts will remain submerged in water while on display.

The 19th-century wreck was discovered late last summer in the Queen Maud Gulf near Gjoa Haven, Nunavut. The HMS Erebus was one half of the ill-fated 1845 British expedition to find the Northwest Passage, led by Sir John Franklin.

Franklin commanded the expedition from the Erebus and is believed to have been on the ship when he died.

The exhibit runs May 14-18 and will also be available online.

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