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Inuit men focus of new $900K project to curb gender-based violence

The federal government announced a new project on Thursday to prevent and address violence against women and girls, and it’s aimed at Inuit men and boys.

Funding 'to engage men and boys as agents of change in reducing violence against women and girls'

Carolyn Bennett, minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs, said stopping violence against Indigenous women and girls requires dealing with the root causes. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

The federal government announced a new project on Thursday to prevent and address violence against women and girls, and it's aimed at Inuit men and boys.

Maryam Monsef, minister for the Status of Women, and Carolyn Bennett, minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs, announced nearly $900,000 in funding to Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada over three years "to engage men and boys as agents of change in reducing violence against women and girls" in Inuit communities, a news release said.

That includes the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Labrador and Nunavik.

Pauktuutit, the national organization representing Inuit women, will partner with men's groups, women's organizations and shelters to develop culturally appropriate strategies to end gender-based violence.
Rebecca Kudloo, Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada president, with Carolyn Bennett, minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, during the announcement of nearly $900,000 in federal funding to the society to combat violence against women and girls. (CBC)

"They will work directly with men's groups to help them take a leadership role against violence," the news release said.

"A national role-model campaign will also be developed to encourage men, women, and youth to speak out and take actions against gender-based violence."

Bennett said stopping violence against Indigenous women and girls requires dealing with the root causes.

"Inuit women in Canada have demonstrated strong leadership and identified the need to include men and boys in any successful strategy," she said.

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