North

Deh Cho bridge tolls and truck fees to resume in November with 1.6% price hike

The Northwest Territories government will keep waiving tolls at the Deh Cho Bridge as well as commercial truck permit fees until the end of October. But commercial drivers can expect a price hike when tolls and fees resume in November.

The increase coincides with the N.W.T. Consumer Price Index, territory says

The Deh Cho Bridge in December 2012. The tolls and fees are set to resume on Nov. 1, according to an N.W.T. news release issued on Monday. (Elizabeth McMillan/CBC)

The Northwest Territories government will keep waiving tolls at the Deh Cho Bridge as well as commercial truck permit fees until the end of October. But commercial drivers can expect a price hike when tolls and fees resume in November.

Waiving the toll was part of the territory's economic relief measures, according to a news release issued on Monday.

The fees, which include purchased and remitted Deh Cho Bridge tolls, fees for over-dimension permits (single and annual), overweight permits, and special permits for large trucks, are set to resume on Nov. 1.

They will be 1.6 per cent higher than they were prior to April.

The territory says it increases the fees annually according to the N.W.T. Consumer Price Index. The higher fees initially came into effect on April 1 but in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, all toll rates and noted permit fees were waived starting in March.

All northbound commercial vehicles over 4,500 kilograms crossing the Deh Cho Bridge are subject to the toll.

The new tolls are as follows:

  • Class A single-use permit: $99/ remittance agreement: $80
  • Class B single-use permit: $179/ remittance agreement: $161
  • Class C single-use permit: $315/ remittance agreement: $296
  • Class D single-use permit: $408/ remittance agreement: $390

The territory says airport fees, which include aircraft landing fees, lease fees and licence fees for all businesses operating at N.W.T. airports will continue to be waived until Dec. 31. The measures are implemented automatically and there is no application process.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

now