North·BRADLYN'S BLOG

Think it's cold where you are? Yukon was the coldest place on Earth this week

January's weather this year has people across the country doing the same thing: bundling up. But the North's been the coldest. Out of the fifteen coldest places on Earth on Friday, 10 were in Yukon and one was in Nunavut.

11 out of 15 coldest places on Earth Friday were in Yukon and Nunavut

A shot of the Yukon River. The latest deep freeze through Yukon has brought extreme temperatures that were some of the coldest in the world and have persisted for over a week. (Submitted by Robert Bojic )

January's weather this year has people across the country doing the same thing: bundling up. 

Extreme cold, snowfall records and blizzards are among the events that have touched almost all parts of Canada

The latest deep freeze through Yukon has brought extreme temperatures that were some of the coldest in the world and have persisted for over a week.

Out of the fifteen coldest places on Earth recorded Friday, eleven were in the Canadian territories, according to WXNow, an extreme weather tracking website. 

And all but one of these were in the Yukon. 

Ice Bridge construction near Dawson City in -45 C. Most of the locations outside Canada ranked as coldest on Earth this week were in Alaska, just over the Yukon border. (Submitted by Sebastien Weisser)

How cold is cold?

On Friday, Carmacks reached a bone-chilling –49.8 C, beating its previous cold record for Jan. 17. Mayo was a close second at –49.4 C.  

A high-pressure ridge brought temperatures to Yukon and N.W.T. that were well below normal. Here's a dinosaur posing in downtown Yellowknife at -40 C. (Submitted by Rhonda Kennedy and Tashina (Lillian) Weagle)

Other communities in Yukon also continued their stretch of –40 C temperatures: Faro at –46.7 C; Beaver Creek at –44.9 C; and Dawson with –44.4 C — coming in third, fourth and fifth respectively. 

Unsurprisingly, most of the locations outside Canada ranked as coldest on Earth were in Alaska, just over the Yukon border. 

Cold temperatures letting up

So, what caused the Yukon to be the coldest place on the planet? That pesky high-pressure ridge that has been stuck over the territory for more than a week. 

This ridge brought temperatures to Yukon and N.W.T. that were well below normal. Extreme cold warnings were in effect for more than a week in some cases, and wind chills feeling like it was below –55 C. 

Now, that ridge is making its way out of the territory and the end is in sight for these cold temperatures as we head into early next week.

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