How can we heal suicide-related trauma? CBC Nunavut asks at public event Saturday

CBC is hosting a panel discussion in Iqaluit Saturday, about ways people have healed after suicide-related trauma.

The free event runs from 2 until 5 p.m. at the Frobisher Inn in Iqaluit

Author Suzanne Sagmeister travelled to Iqaluit in 2015 to collect stories from people affected by suicide for her book, Light after Dark. (Travis Burke/CBC)

CBC is hosting a panel discussion in Iqaluit Saturday, about ways people have healed after suicide-related trauma.

Igalaaq's Madeleine Allakariallak will host the storytelling event, focusing on local survivors of suicide and how we can move forward together.

Panelists in the discussion will include Iqaluit residents and experts who work in mental health.

The event will start with author Suzanne Sagmeister, who visited Iqaluit in 2015 to collect stories for her book Life after Dark: 100 Stories of Hope From Survivors of Suicide.

"I don't come from Iqaluit, but there is one thing that we have in common and that is suicide," she told CBC. "I've been affected by suicide since I was six months old and it's continued to touch me throughout my life."

She said during her 2015 trip she was feeling suicidal, but was rewarded by speaking to people in the community affected by suicide.

"The strength in the culture really was so important to see, and how that translates into them being healers."

She says she hopes this event will help to bring hope to those struggling with trauma and starting a healing conversation.

The event will take place in the Koojesse Room at the Frobisher Inn, Doors open at 1 p.m. and the free event runs from 2 p.m. until 5 p.m.

For those who cannot attend, it will also be lived streamed on CBC Nunavut's Facebook page in English and Inuktitut. 

With files from Marilyn Robak