North

Census 2016: Canada's North sees population bump

The North is becoming more crowded. Canada’s territories showed a nearly six per cent population increase over the last five years, according to 2016 census data from Statistics Canada.

Nunavut leads Canada with 12.7 per cent population increase

Canada's North saw a population bump between 2011 and 2016. Nowhere was the effect more pronounced than in Nunavut. (Sima Sahar Zerehi/CBC)

The North is becoming more crowded.

Canada's territories showed a nearly six per cent population increase over the last five years, according to 2016 census data from Statistics Canada.

According to the census, 113,604 people live in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon. That's up from the 107,265 recorded in the 2011 census. This 5.9 per cent increase is slightly higher than the increase in the national population, which is five percent.

Nunavut showed the strongest population growth in the country, with a 12.7 per cent increase. The census reported 35,944 residents in 2016, compared to 31,906 in 2011. The increase is largely due to its high fertility rate and moved Nunavut ahead of Yukon as the second-most populous territory. 

In Yukon, the population increase of 5.8 per cent was closer to the national average, with 35,874 people compared to 33,897 in 2011.

The Northwest Territories had the least amount of growth in the North at 0.8 per cent. Statistics Canada reported 41,786 residents in 2016, up from 41,462 in 2011.

Nationally, Canada's population surpassed 35 million people, up from 33.5 million in 2011. That rate of growth is the highest among G7 countries.

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