North

ArcticNet conference draws 100s to Halifax

About 600 researchers, students, and scientists are in Halifax, Nova Scotia this week to share the latest research on everything from social issues to the environment in the North.
'This is probably the best occasion we have in Canada every year to get these people together and really share values, and share knowledge,' says Martin Fortier, ArcticNet’s executive director. The ninth annual ArcticNet conference wraps up Friday in Halifax. (Canadian Press)

About 600 Arctic researchers and stakeholders are gathered in Halifax, Nova Scotia for the ninth annual ArcticNet conference.

Researchers from 30 Canadian universities and several federal and provincial governments are taking part, sharing their research on everything from housing and education to permafrost and caribou.

“This is probably the best occasion we have in Canada every year to get these people together and really share values, and share knowledge,” says Martin Fortier, ArcticNet’s executive director.  

For scientists, it's a good way to get feedback, too.

Mylene Riva studies the connection between poor housing and health. She's a professor at Laval University.

“It's always a good venue, actually, to be challenged in our assumptions in research,” she says. “To be reminded that our research has relevance locally and we really have to work with local population.”

Some northerners are also attending.

Simon Okpakok is from Gjoa Haven. He says the research is great, but it needs to be acted on.

“The government of Nunavut as well as the Government of Canada need to open their eyes and actually take a look at the standard of living in the North,” Okpakok says.

The conference wraps up tomorrow.

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