North·The Arctic Kitchen

This frybread recipe is as delicious as it is versatile

Frybread is one of the most versatile comfort foods out there. Just ask Angie Vandale from Saskatoon, who has used the bread as a base for everything from tacos to banana splits.

This recipe can be used as a base for everything from tacos to sundaes

Frybread is a flat dough bread, fried or deep-fried in oil, shortening, or lard. (Submitted by Angie Vandale‎)

Frybread is one of the most versatile comfort foods out there.

Just ask Angie Vandale from Saskatoon — she has used the bread as a base for everything from tacos to banana splits.

She's a cook by trade, but before the pandemic hit she didn't have a lot of time to cook when she got home.

Vandale sometimes puts ice cream on her frybread to make sundaes. (Submitted by Angie Vandale‎)

"Around where I live people sell Indian tacos or bannock burgers made out of frybread and stuff. So since quarantine I thought, 'I should learn how to make that.' I just love it."

When she started making frybread she served it simply — with butter and jam. 

And then she decided to get a bit more experimental, sprinkling it with regular sugar, icing sugar, and cinnamon. Then she really went for the gold — making tacos and sundaes with the bread. 

"My daughter loves ice cream so I thought well maybe I could make a sundae for her, and that worked out really well."

She then drew inspiration from a local place that sells bannock burgers and she started to make a smaller version of those too.

From there, she let her mind run wild with creative treats.

"I just started thinking about all of the food that I like and so I thought  — pizza crust!"

She has made chilli oil and cheese, ham and pineapple, and pulled barbecue pork pizzas.

If your mouth is watering right now, you're not alone. 

Vandale said she was inspired to make these frybread burgers by a local place in Saskatoon that makes bannock burgers. (Submitted by Angie Vandale‎)

How to make it 

Here's the recipe for this delicious and versatile snack.

The dough is simple, 4 cups of flour with 3 cups of warm water.

Add 2 tsp of salt and 3 tsp of baking powder.

Mix those ingredients to make a soft, loose dough. Once you've made that, let it rest for about 30 minutes. 

Portion the dough out into little balls, and let it rest again for about 10 to 15 minutes.

After that, you can roll it out with a rolling pin, though Vandale prefers to use her hands to stretch it out. 

Then you roll the dough or stretch it with your hands until it is quite thin, to the point where you might even see through it a bit.

Lastly you poke a hole in the dough, and you place it into the oil, and fry it up. Vandale said traditionally, lard is used, but she uses canola oil.

From there, whatever toppings you choose are completely up to your imagination!

Vandale also makes delicious pizzas with her frybread. (Submitted by Angie Vandale‎)

CBC North is telling the stories behind recipes posted on our Facebook group, The Arctic Kitchen: Recipes of the North. Join our group if you'd like to follow along.

Written by Danielle d'Entremont, based on an interview with Wanda McLeod

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