'I never even saw him': Video shows sudden collision on Alaska Highway

Steve Page of Edmonton was on his way to Whitehorse last month to compete in a gruelling backcountry ultra race. He quit the race before he even started.

Steve Page of Edmonton was on his way to compete in Yukon Arctic Ultra race last month

Steve Page slammed into the back of another truck on a remote stretch of the Alaska Highway near Fort Nelson, B.C., last month. He says he had a bruise on his sternum that looked like the Dodge Ram logo on his steering wheel cover. (Submitted by Steve Page)

It's billed as the world's toughest ultra race — and for some, it's a challenge to even reach the starting line.

Steve Page of Edmonton was supposed to compete in the Yukon Arctic Ultra last month, but a terrifying road collision en route to Whitehorse forced him to quit the race before he even began. 

He's even got dash cam video of the crash, showing a snowy Alaska Highway drive that ends abruptly when he collides with the back of a truck that suddenly appears in front of him, as if out of nowhere.

Page was driving near Fort Nelson, B.C., on his way to Whitehorse to start the race. He had little time to spare, and had his cruise control set to 80 km/h.

Moments before the impact, he spotted a car in the opposite ditch — someone had apparently driven off the road and left the car with its lights flashing.

"Visibility was pretty bad, and the sun was starting to set ... and just out of nowhere, a semi truck was travelling at a really, really slow rate of speed — and unfortunately, I wasn't," he recalled.

"I never even saw him."

Page slammed into the back of the truck, leaving him pinned inside his own truck with flames and smoke pouring from the hood. Somehow he managed to kick open his door and wrench himself free. 

The truck he hit didn't stick around to help, though — Page says the driver drove ahead a bit, then got out to pull pieces of Page's bumper off the back of his truck before tearing off down the highway. 

"He was driving down the road without any running lights on, and it appears he had removed all the licence plates. So the assumption — and just an assumption — is that [the truck] was stolen."  

Another truck soon came along, and waited with Page for police and ambulance to arrive. Page was taken to Fort Nelson, and got checked out at the hospital. 

He was in remarkably good shape, but not totally unharmed. 

The truck Page slammed into didn't stick around, leaving Page to wait for someone else to come along. (Submitted by Steve Page)

"I had the Dodge Ram logo bruised into my sternum, from the steering wheel cover popping off and hitting me. And a little bit of a burn from the airbag, on my cheek. All of that faded in a couple of days," he says.

He's also suffered some whiplash, he says, and some aches and pains in his back and knees. But he's amazed he wasn't more badly hurt.

"Totally, totally lucky. That's all you can really say. Realistically, to be five weeks after the accident, lifting weights and swimming again? I shouldn't complain," he said.

He's also determined to enter next year's Yukon Arctic Ultra — but he won't be driving to Whitehorse.

"I am going to fly, yeah," he said.

With files from Sandi Coleman