North

Second pedestrian struck on Whitehorse's 2nd Avenue in under 6 weeks

About six weeks after a man was killed using a crosswalk in downtown Whitehorse, another pedestrian has been involved in a collision a couple streets away on the same avenue.

Police say pedestrian sustained non-life threatening injuries

Whitehorse RCMP say a pedestrian was involved in a collision on Monday at the intersection of Second Avenue and Lambert Street. (Steve Silva/CBC)

About six weeks after a man was killed using a crosswalk in downtown Whitehorse, another pedestrian has been involved in a collision a couple streets away on the same avenue.

"We understand that the pedestrian received non-life threatening injuries," the RCMP said in a press release Tuesday about the collision, which happened on Monday.

Police said they were called to a collision at the intersection of Second Avenue and Lambert Street at around noon on Monday.

The press release is light on details and does not say what collided with the pedestrian.

"Regarding the collision, we cannot comment further as this is an active investigation," RCMP communications advisor Kalah Klassen said in an email, when asked for more information.

A portion of Second Avenue was closed for part of Monday afternoon while officers investigated. 

During that time, a car was parked in front of a trail of evidence markers that led to a marked crosswalk at the intersection. The car faced south.

Last month, 48-year-old Merle Gorgichuk died after being hit by a pickup truck. He was crossing at a nearby marked crosswalk at Second Avenue and Elliott Street a little before noon on Nov. 21 when he was hit.

RCMP said the truck was travelling southbound on the avenue, and the driver failed to stop at the crosswalk.

Police say the investigation into the latest collision is in its infancy.

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