Nfld. & Labrador·Video

Homeowners should still vote for affordable housing, says former St. John's councillor

CBC teamed up with Happy City St. John’s to explore key issues in the city’s municipal election, and one of the biggest is affordable housing. Hope Jamieson explains why.

Housing advocate Hope Jamieson says the next St. John's city council needs to confront NIMBYism

What's Your Issue? Housing and the St. John's municipal election

1 year ago
Duration 2:21
Even if you can comfortably afford housing, you have a stake in whether others in your community can do the same. CBCNL teamed up with Happy City St. John’s to explore key issues in the city’s municipal election, and one of the biggest is affordable housing. Hope Jamieson explains why.

Even if you can comfortably afford housing, you have a stake in whether others in your community can do the same.

The next St. John's city council will face big choices between allowing denser housing in urban areas, or sprawling subdivisions that cost more to service. And the consequences of those decisions could show up on your property tax bill.

CBC teamed up with Happy City St. John's to explore key issues in the city's municipal election, in a series we're calling What's Your Issue?

And a major issue in the city is affordable housing.

Hope Jamieson is the provincial project manager for Community Housing Transformation Centre, a national affordable housing advocacy organization. She's also a former St. John's City Councillor who led the city's affordable housing strategy.

In this video, Jamieson explains how NIMBYism — "NIMBY" stands for Not In My Backyard — raises the cost of housing for everyone, and why the next city council needs to push back.

Read more articles from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Zach Goudie is a journalist and video producer with CBC in St. John's.

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