Nfld. & Labrador

Video game designers hope to advance 'Giant Cop' to next level

A Newfoundland and Labrador company has developed a new video game that lets you be a "Giant Cop", and now Other Ocean Interactive is trying to take it to the next level.

New video game lets you be top cop

Giant Cop, Other Ocean Interactive's newest video game, is getting lots of positive feedback. (CBC)

A Newfoundland and Labrador company has developed a new video game that lets you be a "Giant Cop", and now Other Ocean Interactive is trying to take it to the next level.

The game is set in the 70's, and while it is still in the prototype stage, designers say gamers like it.

'"You literally play as a giant cop. You're 200 feet tall, trying to clean up the city and protect the people of Micro City," said Design Director, Marc McGinley. "It's a kind of over the top, quirky, crazy kind of thing."

Design Director, Marc McGinley, says being in St. John's has a big influence on what they do. "We have a lot of local people working on the game, so it is hugely important to us." (CBC)

Feedback from players is important for the game's development.

 In September, a group of designers took Giant Cop to EGX, the United Kingdom's largest gaming show.

"We wanted to take the early prototype of Giant Cop and really put it front of a big community," said McGinley.

"It's really the first opportunity for us to put the game in a ton of people's hands... It's been invaluable for us in terms of feedback."

Other Ocean Interactive video game makers are excited about one of their newest creations, Giant Cop. (CBC)

Getting Giant Cop to this stage has taken a lot of teamwork and brainstorming.

 "It's not just playing games all day, you design a feature...and you have to tweak it and change it," said McGinley.

The game's lead artist, Jon Lambe, hopes people can have as much fun playing the game as he did making it.

Lead artist, Jon Lambe, says he finds his work very rewarding. "There is a sense of satisfaction that you get out of seeing people enjoy the things that you animate and build." (CBC)

"There is a sense of satisfaction that you get out of seeing people enjoy the things that you animate and build," said Lambe.

Even if gamers like Giant Cop, it won't be enough to put the game on store shelves. McGinley said that takes money.

"We're looking to find funding for the rest of the project so the hope is that were going to spend another year working on the game and then it's going to be released."

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