Nfld. & Labrador

Court orders Central Health to reconsider hospital privileges for Dr. Todd Young

A Springdale doctor who is fighting to get his hospital privileges back after being disciplined for inappropriate conduct will get another chance to make his case.

Dr. Todd Young argued he was not given chance to see or respond to evidence against him

Dr. Todd Young was disciplined by the Newfoundland and Labrador College of Physicians, but returned to work after a fine and a 19-month suspension. (CBC)

A Springdale doctor who is fighting to get his hospital privileges back after being disciplined for inappropriate conduct will get another chance to make his case.

The Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador has ruled that Dr. Todd Young did not get a fair chance to review and respond to the information used by the Central Health Authority to deny him privileges.

In a decision released Wednesday, Justice William Goodridge ruled that Young's application be reconsidered and that Dr. Jeff Cole, vice-president of medical services with Central Health, have no involvement with the new hearing.

It is the latest chapter in a long battle between Young and the health authority, a battle that saw patients rally in support of the Springdale doctor after he was disciplined for having sex with a former patient.

Linda Rowsell was among dozens of patients and politicians who rallied in support of Todd Young's fight for hospital privileges. (Chris Ensing/CBC)

Young withdrew from practice in April 2014 after admitting to a three-year relationship with a former patient.

He also admitted to inappropriate conduct, which involved hugging and kissing, with a second patient.

When Young returned to work, after serving a 19-month suspension of his license and paying a $20,000 fine, he was told he could not admit patients to hospitals run by Central Health, or treat them inside the facilities.

Accusations of bias

Young expressed frustration at the time, saying the health authority had not given him full details on why it made the decision, or allow him to make his case.

Arguing that the lack of hospital privileges made it difficult to practice medicine in a rural community, and that — in his view — the decision maker was biased, Young hired lawyer Jerome Kennedy to take the case to the Supreme Court.

During a Supreme Court hearing in April 2016, Young argued that Central Health was biased and had not given him a chance to respond. (Carolyn Stokes/CBC)

The health authority argued during an April 2016 hearing that Young broke its trust, and that his past could make him a legal liability.

In ordering that Young's application be reconsidered, Justice Goodridge agreed that he had been denied "procedural fairness."

He added Young should have full disclosure of all the information used to make a decision his case, and have a reasonable opportunity to respond.